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Import settings from iPhone 3G to iPhone 3Gs

Well, if there’s one available at one of the local AT&T stores, the Best Buy, or the Walmart, I’ll be the proud owner of a new iPhone 3GS. I think my first stop will be Walmart… nobody is brave enough to camp out at a Walmart are they? Not with all the trampling fiascos over the past year…. besides, you can’t beat their return polices.

What I’m looking for is the best way to migrate from one iPhone to the latest and greatest – hopefully taking as many of the settings with as possible. I’m looking for saved SMS messages, email accounts, photos, notes, and other personal settings… everything. Here is my plan.

First, make sure to have the latest iPhone OS 3.0. You don’t want to try and install iphone 2 on the new iPhone 3Gs because, well, it isn’t supported.

The next step also falls under preparation, backup my current iphone. To make sure it’s been done, I’ll plug in my iphone 3G. Right click (control click) on the Phone in itunes, and choose backup.

Your Backup will be stored here:
On a Mac: ~/Library/Application Support/MobileSync/Backup/

On Windows XP: Documents and Settings(username)Application DataApple ComputerMobileSyncBackup

On Windows Vista: Users(username)AppDataRoamingApple ComputerMobileSyncBackup

I anticipate that I’ll need to enter email account passwords again, but if all goes well, all my junk will all be there.

Update: Well I strolled into my local AT&T store at about 8:00. Fully staffed and no line. They had a 32 Gig, and five minutes later I was out the door. Connected to the wifi at the starbucks next door from my truck and restored from backup. Basically, iTunes walks you though the entire thing and this post is for nothing. 🙂 Apple is cool like that.

Changing a Fuel Pressure Regulator on hard starting 2000 Chevy Silverado Yourself

I was having a problem with my 2000 Chevrolet Silverado. It was starting hard all the time with the exception of first thing in the morning. The first start of the day would go just fine, but the rest would turn over and over rapidly until I pumped the gas pedal. Then it would start but it would sputter for a little bit. Once or twice it also quit on me when I was slowing down to turn a corner.

I had this issue a few years ago and I paid about $200 to get it fixed. The repair shop replaced the fuel pressure regulator, also known as the fuel flow regulator. I figured I could do it myself and as it turns out it’s relatively cheap and quite easy.

First you need to test if your truck has a broken fuel pressure regulator. To do that you need to run the vehicle for about a minute and then turn it off and remove the vacuum line from the regulator -If fuel leaks out, it needs to be replaced. It’s about the size of a walnut and is located on the drivers side fuel rail for the 5.3 liter v8.

Faulty Fuel Flow Regulator

Here are the steps to replace it yourself.

1. Tools and parts needed: Fire extinguisher, a pair of screwdrivers, and something to take the negative post off your battery. The part I got was about $60 from amazon: BWD Automotive 24027 Pressure Regulator (V08161). (update: I’ve heard most people end up paying around $80 for the part elsewhere)

2. Depressurize the fuel system. Start by removing the gas cap.

3. The pressure isn’t gone yet… now you have to pull the fuel pump relay out engine compartments fuse box. And then start the vehicle until it dies. If it doesn’t quit, you pulled the wrong relay, consult the manual. If you do not do this step, gasoline under 40+ lbs of pressure will spray in your face and on the engine.
Fuel Pump relay

4. Disconnect the negative terminal from the battery. (if you’re studying this photo, maybe this project isn’t for you)
Disconnect battery

5. Remove vacuum line and the clip that is holding the regulator in there. I used a pair of screwdrivers to pop it off. Once removed the regulator should just slide right out. Now the fuel screen/filter may be left behind. My kit came with a new filter.
Regulator removed, filter is still there

6. The parts should come out in this order (pictured is not OEM – I had this replaced once before so yours may look different) Notice I got out the little gasket behind the fuel filter.
Fuel Pressure Regulator Parts

gasket

7. Here is a picture of it fully removed.
removed

8. Lube the rubber gaskets supplied with the new Fuel Pressure Regulator with a little engine oil.

9. To replace it, just push the new one in and follow the steps in reverse. It may start hard the first time because it has to build the fuel pressure back up. (Note: you may not need all the bushings supplied)
New part in place

Good luck!

Repair Service 4wd Light on 2000 Chevy Silverado

There is a common problem with 1999-2001 Chevrolet Silverado where the service 4wd light comes on in the vehicle. The light is scary and led me to believe there were major issues with my four wheel drive, but it turns out its a quick, cheap, and painless fix by swapping out the 4wd selector switch. If you take it to a dealer they will charge you from as low as $180 to as high as $400. I’ll show you how to fix it for $50 in 5 minutes.

Update: Before step 1… make sure your transfer case fuse is good. On my truck it’s labeled ATC (Auto Transfer Case) and is located in the main fuse box under the hood.

Step 1: Remove the Dash Plate (to get the part number of your switch)
Pop off the dash. It’s simple and doesn’t requires tools. Tilt your steering wheel down and put the gear shift in 1st. Now using your fingers, pull the dash plate off. There are about a dozen points where it connects. Pop them off and pull the dash plate off.
Remove the Dash Plate

Step 2: Pop out the 4wd Select switch
To remove the four wheel drive select switch there are little plastic locks on the top and on the right, hold them up and pull out.
Pop out the 4wd Select switch

Step 3: Get the part number of the switch
Turn the switch over and look for the part number on the back. Mine is a 2000 Silverado Z-71 Extended Cab. The part number is the longer of the two – 15709327. I believe they used this part for 1999, 2000, and 2001.
Get the part number of the switch

Step 4: Order the part
You can purchase the part, APDTY 012173 4×4, Four Wheel Drive 4WD Transfer Case Selector Button Switch. Replaces GM Part Numbers 15709327, or 19168767, from amazon by clicking the link below.

Step 5: Put in the new part
Once the part arrives, use the steps above to remove the switch and replace the new one. Total repair time: 3 minutes (and I was a huge dork and took pictures).
Pop it in

Hack your T-Mobile Nokia 6133 to Allow Opera Mini and More

Step 1: Get the phone

Option 1: Get a Nokia 6133 unbranded

  • you’re all set, move on to step 2.

Option 2: Get a Nokia 6133b from T-Mobile

  1. Completely charge your phone
  2. Pay for flashing by www.iunlock.com. Great service. (ship it or drop it off)
  3. Wait for phone to get back (Takes about a week round trip.)

Step 2: Hack iSync and pair with Mac.

Step 3: Get T-Mobile settings from nokiausa.com

  1. Got to www.nokiausa.com
  2. Click on Support » Setup.
  3. Click on Get Settings (under Settings and Browsing and MMS Messaging image)
  4. Click on Get Standard Settings.
  1. Accept terms
  2. start
  3. Choose your phone. (if 6133 is not listed choose 6131)
  4. select T-Mobile USA as your network
  5. select T-Mobile Internet as your service providor
  6. enter your security code, phone number and send it to your phone.
  7. Receive text message with settings. (save, and load them)
  1. Accept them.
  2. Load them

Step 4: Set-up Custom Data Access (for java apps)

  1. Menu
  2. Settings
  3. Configuration
  4. Personal config settings
  5. Options: Add New
  6. Choose Access point from the list
  7. Enter a something for Account Name
  8. Then go into Access Point Settings
  9. Under Data Bearer choose Packet Data
  10. And in Bearers settings enter the following:
  1. Packet Data Access Point: wap.voicestream.com
  2. Network Type: IPv4
  3. Authentification type: Normal
  4. User name: *blank*
  5. password: *blank*

Step 5: Get Java Applications

Get Opera Mini:

  1. On your phone go to mini.opera.com
  2. Download Opera mini
  3. Install it
  4. Start browsing

Best Opera Mini Sites:
My Home Page: m.netvibes.com –it gives me access to weather, gmail, espn, yahoo sports, new york times, and basically any feed you can think of all on one tiny page.

Get Google Maps:

  1. On your phones browser (not opera) go to moble.google.com/
  2. CLick on google maps
  3. Download and install the app

Get Gmail:

I couldn’t get the gmail java app working, there is always m.gmail.com on your web browser (Opera Mini)

Steps I Tried to get Gmail working – none worked, contact me if you get it working!

The flashed phone is not recognized by google so you have to circumvent the certificate by placing it on your phone manually. The certificate required by Gmail Mobile Application is available for download at www.verisign.com/support/roots.html.

Here’s an alleged guide to get the required certificate to resolve the “Your phone doesn’t have the appropriate certificate to communicate with Gmail” error.

  1. Download the certificate at www.fourteenfloor.com/files/PCA3ss_v4.cer to your computer.
  2. Transfer the certificate into your mobile phone and store it. .
  1. Click on the File in the finder
  2. Click on the Finder menu » Services » Send file to bluetooth device (shift-apple-b)
  3. Choose your phone from the list and choose send
  4. Accept the file on your phone

www.gmail.com/app/v1.0.0/en/gmail-g.jar

  • On your phone go to gmail.com/app (on your phones browser, not Opera Mini)
  • Select Download Gmail
  • “Application Source Unknown” Click Continue
  • Accept Certificate
  • Launch gmail
  • Note Widsets are kind of fun.

    Import Mail from Mac OS X into Gmail

    Everyone who is migrating to Gmail loves the google search feature for all your new mail, but wouldn’t it be nice if you could get all of your old email messages into Gmail from your Mac OS X Mail.app without forwarding the thousands of messages you’ve accumulated over the years by hand?

    Mark Lyon wrote a great little PC program in python that automates importing your old email messages to your gmail account. The site instructions and the program are for Windows and work great, but what about us Mac users?

    He was nice enough to include the python source code that also happens to work with Mac OS X, but for those of you that have no idea how to run python scripts, or don’t even know what python is and have no clue about mbox files, I’ve written a simple applescript that uses the terminal to automate the process for all of your mailboxes.

    The script requires you to download Mark’s source code, modify a few settings and then click run to automate the process for all of your Mac OS X Mail.app mailboxes, while allowing you to exclude other mailboxes.

    1. Download Mark’s script to your Desktop. Instructions Here.
    2. Download my gmlAutomator AppleScript.
    3. Open the script in Script Editor.
    4. Modify the properties at the top of the script
    5. Run the AppleScript.

    Update:
    Another even more simple way to accomplish this was sent to me by Ken. The process is to create a new rule in Mail.app with the action “redirect to
    myaccount@gmail.com”. Have it match whatever messages
    you’re interested in bouncing up to gmail, for example all of
    ’em. Select the messages you’re interested in sending off and
    run Message -> Apply Rules. Done!

    If you leave the rule in, new (matching) messages will also get
    bounced to gmail (and still preserved in Mail.app).
    Read more

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